Reflections on the #etmooc orientation

I created a Storify collection of my favorite tweets and videos from the orientation session tonight. Below I’ve included the highlights of the highlights.

The digital citizenship discussion drew a lot of commentary. But I think the bit that struck me was Alec’s very aspirational goal: At the end of this MOOC, using what we’ve learned to actually DO something as a connected network. That’s a game changer.

On how to deal with the overwhelming stream of info flowing through blogs, Twitter, etc. This really is both an attitude and a skill. And it’s critical for MOOCs.

One of the measures of success, I think, of a network that has embraced learning is the amount of commenting across blogs. It’s tough to get over the original blog-posting fear. Another thing to also comment on others’ ideas. But it really does force you to reflect more deeply on your own thinking, in different ways.

Two very inspirational videos were referenced. The ski jump video was used by Alec Couros to end the session – a great analogy for moving off the top of the hill. Plus – the kid is awesome. Alison Seaman’s referenced video (“Obvious to you, amazing to others”) also strikes a chord with me. It’s another mindset that needs reinforcing. Share because others may find what you share amazing. And it’s true.

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16 Comments

  1. Thanks for posting that second video. I totally missed it, but that is exactly what I am like. My own thoughts are so banal that I don’t think anyone would find them interesting. I never want to present at conferences because “I have nothing to say.”

    1. Appreciate the comment, Peter. Thanks to my fellow blogger Alison Seaman for linking to that video. It really does get an an important point. Alec talked about it tonight a bit – trust, and just getting over that idea that no one might be interested in what you are saying. In my classes, I’ve begun to use the phrase “brave enough to go half baked” to get at the same thing.

  2. Hi Jeff, great example of a mash up of sources to create a blog (Storify, the videos, and some annotation) I also love how perspectives vary but how important it is to circle back over and see from someone else point of view to expand, grow and deepen your own perspective.
    Although I heard this “using what we’ ve learned to actually DO something as a connected network” I did not pull it our as clearly as you have.

    1. Appreciate it Carolyn. It is funny. There was so much going on in that session (the white boards were a great example), I think we need the whole network to help us pick through and highlight points. I know I do.

  3. Wow, Jeff. Great summary of the things you saw as key points and quotes of the thinking in the #etmooc. This is my first chance to sit down and think about it since the online meeting. I appreciate you taking the time to put down your ideas – I found myself doing my reflection with you. I’ve never used Storify before, but it looks like a neat app. Were the tweets you embedded just screenshots? I’d love to do that some in my blogging. Thanks again!

    1. Thanks! I mention in another comment that I think it takes the whole network to reflect on something as fast-moving as that orientation session. Great way to pick up different points of view, and insights. Hope more will do the same.

      FYI also those actually were not screen shots. If you have a WordPress blog, there is a cool little feature that allows you to embed those picture-like versions of tweets. See http://en.support.wordpress.com/twitter/twitter-embeds/.

  4. Hi Jeff, I cannot agree more with everyone’s comments, thanks for reflecting upon key points and issues whilst giving us the opportunity to learn about and put into play some of the tools and strategies mentioned in the session.

  5. Thanks for sharing this storify and your reflections. Was unable to join the session today but hoping to catch the repeat tomorrow. The feedback has been so positive and there is a real buzz around this ETMOOC. I think the point you make about ‘missing something’ is a really valid one and one I struggle with. At the moment in Australia, we are on holidays so I have plenty of time but that will all change soon. I am really going to have to focus and use the time I have for ETMOOC wisely rather than flitting from thing to thing. Thanks for prompting me to think about this.

    1. Yes…Alison Seamans picked up on Bonnie Stewart’s insight about “missing stuff.” I have seen this from others’ as well. I believe Howard Rheingold gets at it in his book Net Smarts. It really is just accepting reality; you never WILL catch it all. And we never have; a lot of this stuff was already out there but we didn’t stress about “missing it” before we jumped online, did we? There is certainly a skill to capturing more – but that is an endless pursuit. Just need to get comfy with it and roll along. You’ll be amazed at what you DO pick up.

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